UA-28463509-1 UA-92643257-1

Triumph

Triumph

 

Having it's own distinctive character and history of design classic motorcycles has made the Triumph brand iconic.

Founded by Siegfried Bettmann in 1887 the New Triumph Company imported bicycles and sewing machines into Coventry, England. With financial help from John Dunlop the company purchased an old ribbon making factory in 1888. This is where the company produced it's first bicycles designed by lead engineer Mauritz Schulte.

In 1895 Schulte imported a motorcycle made by Hidebrand and Wolfmuller in order to study, but put the project on hold when he realized it would not be street legal in England because of it's strict 4-mph speed limit.

By 1902 the laws in England had changed. The first motorcycle they built was known as the No. 1 by Triumph Cycle Co. It was basically a Triumph bicycle fitted with a 2-hp Belgium motor. In 1903 they opened another facility in Germany where they were able to source better engines. By 1907 Triumph had made 1000 motorcycles. By 1908 some models had a rudimentary pulley system that allowed for gear changes. Jack Marshall won the TT that same year averaging 45 mph.

Despite its strong ties to Germany, Triumph was chosen to supply motorcycles to the Allied military troops. Thirty thousand Type H motorcycles were supplied over the course of WWI.

Triumph remained strong in the motorcycle industry, with many world records and race wins, all the way through the 1960's. The late 1970's and early 80's proved to be lean years for Triumph. The door's closed in 1983.

In 1985 English property developer John Bloor buys the remaining Triumphs and builds new facilities. Over the next 10 years the company grew slowly. 1995 Triumph started exporting their new models to America. With bikes like the TT600, Rocket III, Speed Triple, and Daytona 600 Triumph made great strides towards relevancy. 2006 brought the all new Daytona 675. Triumph was back!